Category Archives: Technology Review

Who Are You?

I often travel to different countries chasing stories. It’s hard for me, let alone my credit card issuers, to predict where I’ll be at any given time. This summer, for example, I moved from Madrid, Spain, to Oaxaca, Mexico, and in November I made quick trips to both California and Nicaragua. Confused by my unpredictable spending patterns, my credit card companies often block my legitimate transactions. Continue reading

Credit Moyan Brenn: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aigle_dore/5238672496/in/photolist-9r6iyE-8YSvcg-8YV91s-8YV1k7-8YVyPA-8YRZrc-8YVHNu-92RrQE-8YRWKM-8YS1rk-8YS2mF-8YV59S-8YV5ih-8YS6b8-8YS17D-8YV9gC-8YRYMz-8YRZbD-kAXGfC-wLe3r-furpWj-8YV4DA-9jUXSJ-4sxpTD-bnjQN3-azWMxq-abP9wX-AqhMF-dxfFVH-dxfFsT-7Js9WJ-8NFxBX-5zxwNc-dTQPXg-6zHmCY-nC4JjD-6s5sKy-dTWsfu-HnzEv-62x74g-572oS9-9dvvBN-8YVyYb-5Hhc29-i9JTwV-6ps8D9-ab43U2-53CQsh-4Cxygx-4m3tC9

Barcelona’s Smart City Ecosystem

Gardeners making their rounds through Barcelona’s Parc del Centre del Poblenou these days are as likely to carry tablets as trowels. The city recently moved 178 of its irrigation points to an Internet-controlled system. While it is handy to manage watering at the keyboard instead of turning a knob on a pipe, much of the advantage is in the data that the new system sends back to a central software system the city has built. Continue reading

Cheap Magnetic Helmet Detects Some Kinds of Brain Damage

VEPSA helmet that sends a magnetic field through the wearer’s head might someday offer a quick way to reveal whether the brain is  swelling or bleeding as the result of an injury.

In a prototype of the helmet, a small halo-like coil generates a magnetic field above a person’s head; another coil, just above the ears, detects the magnetic field induced in the volunteer’s brain. Because liquid such as blood affects the magnetic field’s phase, the team behind the device was able to distinguish eight brain-injured patients from 46 healthy volunteers in a pilot study, they report in the journal PLOS One. Continue reading

Sentry System Combines a Human Brain with Computer Vision

Sentry duty is a tough assignment. Most of the time there’s nothing to see, and when a threat does pop up, it can be hard to spot. In some military studies, humans are shown to detect only 47 percent of visible dangers.

A project run by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) suggests that combining the abilities of human sentries with those of machine-vision systems could be a better way to identify danger. It also uses electroencephalography to identify spikes in brain activity that can correspond to subconscious recognition of an object. Continue reading